Contemporary Architecture

The Rotating Tower,Dubai and Suite Vollard, Curitiba – David H. Fisher

 David Fisher

The Rotating Tower,Dubai and Suite Vollard, Curitiba – David H. Fisher
  • Italian Architect based in Florence owning a design firm called “Infinity Design”
  • Honors at Faculty of Architecture in Florence University
  • Taught as faculty in the same and in structural engineering department
  • Awarded PhD Honoris causa by the Prodeo Institute at Columbia University (NY)
  • Not a traditional architect as he worked mainly in the field of construction redefining the technical and technological extremes of building
  • Involved in restoration of ancient buildings
  • Pioneer in the field of prefabrication and dynamic buildings

ARCHITECTURE IS TECHNOLOGY:

Since the beginning, with his involvement in “Binishells” technology, David Fisher’s design studio has developed a vision of architecture resulting from technological and economic considerations, with aesthetics being the natural output of the above.
ARCHITECTURE IS FEASIBILITY:

Since the first large project, “the Marriott Aruba” , Dr. Fisher has taken part in the complete process of construction, from the feasibility study, to financing, to construction management and the  final commissioning of the project.

ARCHITECTURE IS FUNCTIONALITY:

  • For David Fisher Architecture is the space for living and the life of the people must not be conditioned by an architect’s extravagance.
  • Infinity Design gives puts a strong focus on the flexibility of the space as life, architecture must change together with the needs of the people and the changes of the environmental conditions.

PREFABRICATION:

  • 3,800 B.C. – Ancient Egyptians built the pyramids and buildings until now are based on gravity: stones/bricks/blocks are positioned one on top of the other.
  • 1436 – Brunelleschi designed the dome of the Cathedral of Florence.The biggest dome ever built, challenging horizontal forces.
  • 1889 – The first iron structure, the Eiffel Tower, was built in Paris . Many skyscrapers are built of bolted steel traces, based on the same technology.
  • 1905 – Reinforced concrete was created by combining cement with iron bars; most structures until now are made of reinforced concrete.
  • 2008 — Prefabrication when 90% of building (Dynamic Tower) was prefabricated including the preassembled cores

“Almost every product used today is the result of an industrial process and can be transported around the world, from cars and boats to computers and clothing. Factories are chosen for their ready access to materials, production technology, inexpensive labor, efficiency, and other conditions that result in high quality at a relatively low cost.

It is unbelievable that real estate and construction, which is the leading sector of the world economy, is also the most primitive. For example, most workers throughout the world still regularly use trowels, which were first used by the Egyptians and then by the Romans. Buildings should be no different from any other .product,. and from now on they will be manufactured in a production facility”– Dr David Fisher

“Doing buildings on site, as we do since the pyramids, is as if we were producing cars in the parking lot or an aircraft on the runway…

Our building in fact are made of preassembled units, that arrive to the site completed of all finishing, equipment, plumbing and air conditioning, ready for a fast and easy installation process.

So these buildings are feasible.

I mentioned functionality — well, also the interior partition will be flexible if they will ever exist… look how flexible is our digital part of life. . . why should we still live in a medieval castle where the wall do not let us any freedom and we can modify them when our way of life get changed.”–Dr. David Fisher

REDEFINING DYNAMIC ARCHITECTURE:

  • Dynamic Architecture buildings keep modifying their shape
  • Traditional architecture – Gravity
  • Dynamic architecture – Motion dynamics
  • A mechanical approach to civil construction – Transdisciplinary
  • Buildings will no more remain the ‘fossilized imagination’ of the architect;
  • They will change, constantly bringing new views and experiences to us with time
  • Introducing the fourth dimension in architecture : TIME

Suite Vollard:

  • The Suite Vollard is a futuristic residential building in Curitiba, Parana, Brazil.
  • This Apartment Building was Designed by a team of Architects, headed by Bruno de Franco & David Fisher
  • This building is the only one of its kind in the world, as each of the 11 apartments can rotate 360º.
  • Each apartment can spin individually in any direction. One rotation takes a full hour.
  • The apartment rings rotate around a static core used for building services, utilities, and all areas which require plumbing.
  • Each apartment was sold for approximately R$ 400,000.00 ($US 300,000.00).

The Rotating Tower:

  • 80 floors, 420 meters tall.
  • First 20 floors will be Offices.
  • Floors 21 to 35 will be a Luxury hotel,
  • Floors 36 to 70 will be Apartments.
  • While the top 10 floors will be luxury Villas.
  • Apartment sizes range from 124 sq.m to villa of size 1200 sq.m
  • It will be the first building in the World to be entirely constructed from factory made prefabricated parts.
  • These parts are being manufactured in a factory in Altamura, Italy.
  • It will require just 600 people in the assembly facility and 80 technicians on the site instead of min. 2000 workers for a similar building.•the consturction will complete by the end of this year.
  • “The Rotating Tower Of Dubai will be the First Industrial Skyscraper ever constructed. 90% of the building will be prefabricated and assembled on a central core, the only part built with traditional reinforced concrete poured on the site.”
  • “I call the non-moving buildings Tombstones……buildings should start being part of the universe, and therefore dynamic…..   How could one think that digital homes of future will be as immobile as our grandmother’s house.”

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Contemporary Architecture

Frei Otto – Tuwaiq Palace

About the Building:

  • Recipient of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture, 1998.
  • enclosed by inclined curved walls, forming a sinuous curvilinear spine 800 m long, 12 m high, and 7-13 m wide, used for guest services and accommodations
  • outdoor sports facilities, gardens, and extensive landscaping laid out in a pattern of complementary spirals, circles, and curves, in harmony with the building’s undulations
  • Mushrooming from the spine are tents supported by tensile-structure technology
  • design makes reference to two local archetypes – the fortress and the tent
  • The tents enclose the large-scale spaces: main lounges, reception areas, multi-purpose halls, restaurants, and a café
  • dramatic contrast between the lush greenery of the outdoor spaces enclosed by the spine and the arid rocky plateau beyond its walls
  • The white tents are made of Teflon-coated, woven fibre fabric
  • The tents are enclosed by glass walls

LIFE:

  • Began experimenting with tents for shelter
  • After the war he studied briefly in the United States
  • Visited Erich Mendelsohn, Mies van der Rohe, Richard Neutra, and Frank Lloyd Wright
  • Began private practice in Germany in 1952

Awards

  • 1974 Thomas Jefferson Medal in Architecture
  • 1996/7 Wolf Prize in Architecture
  • 2005 RIBA Royal Gold Medal

Style:

  • authority on lightweight tensile and membrane structures
  • concerned with space frames and structural efficiency
  • experimented with inflatable buildings

Inflatable buildings:

  • structure constructed using two layers of membrane connected together
  • cavity formed between the layers is pressurized with air producing a rigid structural element
  • pavilions, airships, furniture, airspace structures, boats, escape slides, security mattresses, swimming pools, coverings, games and castles, air bags

Academics

  • Otto founded the famous Institute for Lightweight Structures at the University of Stuttgart in 1964

List of Buildings:

  • 1967 – West Germany Pavilion at Expo 67 Montreal
  • 1970 – Tuwaiq Palace, Saudi Arabia, with Buro Happold
  • 1972 – Roof for Olympic Stadium, Munich
  • 2000 – Roof structure of the Japanese Pavilion at Expo 2000, Hanover Germany (provided engineering assistance with Buro Happold and architectural collaboration with Shigeru Ban)

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